5 Chocolate Brown Hair Color Ideas for Brunettes

Vibrant chocolate hues remain in the mainstream from season to season. No wonder, they are of the same importance to brunettes and girls with medium brown hair as platinum or strawberry blonde to blondes. The palette of chocolate shades varies from milk chocolate with warm red notes to the cool bittersweet one. Commonly we attribute to the chocolates all the sweet and delicious browns, such as mocha, hot cocoa, truffle brown, chocolate cherry, brown sugar, espresso, sweet cola, etc. Chocolate hair looks classy, dramatic and occasionally a little bit strict. Even men unconsciously believe that women with chocolate hair are more serious, trustworthy and loyal. That’s why dark-haired ladies happen to hold top positions much more often than lightheaded blondes. However, a chocolate brunette can easily look very feminine and romantic once she curls her delicious locks or shape them into a chic updo. Since chocolate palette is rather broad and versatile, even most blondes can afford it.

The Right Hue of Chocolate Brown Hair
The choice of the right hue depends on your skin undertone (warm/cool) and your personal preferences: some women prefer chocolate tones with a reddish tint, others try to achieve noble cold shades. With the right choice of hue, chocolate color refreshes your face and makes it look younger.

According to the four-season typology that suggests creating your image around a defined color palette that brings out the natural tones of your appearance, women with warm golden undertone of skin, belonging to the autumn colortype, will look great with chocolate hair hues, bearing a warm reddish sheen. And ladies with cool or olive skin undertones (summer or winter colortype) should try to achieve deep velvety hues without any warm red tints. Normally these are the shades such as hot or black chocolate. As for the “spring girls” with clear warm skin undertone and natural light golden blonde or strawberry blonde hair, chocolate hues are not their best choice, since a “spring” face is going to look a kind of washed out in such a rich vibrant frame.

Chocolate hair harmonizes the best with tanned skin and green, hazel or brown eyes. However, keeping in mind all the variety of chocolate hues, it would be fair to say that almost any woman can select her most flattering chocolate shade. There are fantastic examples of rich chocolate hair, complimenting fair skin with cool undertone and clear blue or blue-grey eyes. Such looks appear highly contrasting and eye-catching, but remember to make a start from something that is given to you by nature. How to choose the right hue? Viewing the gallery we have prepared for you may help a lot.

1: Espresso Base with Hazel Ribbons

Blonde and light chocolate highlights woven throughout boost the glossy effect of this mane, while the wavy texture complements the layers. Espresso colored hair is gorgeous, but it can get a little bland. Added color and texture are surefire ways to bring it to life.

2: Medium Bob with Light Brown Highlights

A classic ‘do that suits all ages and will never go out of style is a medium chocolate bob with light brown highlights. Choose a light brown a few tones lighter than your roots for a fresh and natural look that’ll make you appear at least 5 years younger!

3: Thick Brown Hair with Caramel Ribbons

Light caramel ribbons blended into a deep brown base create a bold contrast that makes a statement. Juxtaposing, multi-toned highlights are popular once again so there’s no better time to try them out! Playing around in brown tones suits every skin undertone.

4: Graduated Bob with Caramel Streaks

Rich browns aren’t only reserved for those with long locks! Add some gorgeous caramel smears for an instantly brighter complexion. The optical illusion from the color placement will also make hair look thicker and healthier.

5: Cherry Chocolate Balayage Bob

A wild, wavy angled bob is the epitome of cool — and pairing the style with a chocolate cherry hair shade is the literal cherry on top of the edgy, chic look. Keep the roots dark reddish brown, and allow for a slightly brighter, coppery cherry to lighten things up towards the bottom.